What is the difference between asset and liability measurement?

In this opportunity we will deal with the differences between passive and active measuring instruments. At the bottom of the article you will find a comparative table with the main distinctions, but we will let you know the concepts of each word.

What are active instruments?

Active instruments are those instruments in which the quantity to be measured activates the magnitude of the external energy input source that produces the measurement.

An example of an active instrument is a float-type fuel tank level gauge. In this instrument, the change in gasoline level moves a potentiometer arm and the output signal consists of a proportion of the external voltage source applied via the two ends of the potentiometer. The energy in the output signal is born from the external power source; the primary transducer float system is simply modulating the voltage value of this external power source.

What you need to know about active instruments

  • Active instruments are those instruments in which the quantity to be measured activates the magnitude of the external energy input source that produces the measurement.
  • On active instruments, the resolution can be adjusted by adjusting the magnitude of the external power input.
  • On active instruments, an additional external power input source is required.
  • The design of active instruments is quite complicated (complex).
  • Due to the complexity in the design and the greater number of elements, active instruments are more expensive compared to passive instruments.
  • Active instruments have a high resolution.
  • Examples of active instruments include liquid level indicator, flow indicator, among others.

What are passive instruments?

They have been instruments where the output is completely generated by the quantity that is measured.

An example of a passive instrument is the pressure measurement device. Fluid pressure is translated into the movement of a pointer against a scale. The energy expended in moving the pointer is derived entirely from the change in measured pressure, there are no other energy inputs to the system.

What you need to know about passive instruments

  • Passive instruments are instruments where the output is generated entirely by the quantity being measured.
  • On the passive instrument, the resolution cannot be easily adjusted.
  • In a passive instrument, it does not need an additional power input source.
  • Passive instruments are simple to design.
  • Passive instruments are cheaper, therefore economical.
  • Passive instruments have a relatively lower resolution compared to active instruments.
  • Examples of passive instruments are manometer, voltmeter, glass thermometer, ammeter, among others.

Difference between active and passive instruments

ACTIVE INSTRUMENTS PASSIVE INSTRUMENTS
Description Active instruments are those instruments in which the quantity to be measured activates the magnitude of the external energy input source that produces the measurement. Passive instruments are instruments where the output is produced entirely by the quantity being measured.
Resolution setting On active instruments, the resolution can be adjusted by adjusting the magnitude of the external power input. On the passive instrument, the resolution cannot be easily adjusted.
additional energy On active instruments, an additional external power input source is required. In passive instrument, no additional power input source is required.
Design The design of active instruments is quite complicated (complex). Passive instruments are easy to design.
Cost Due to the complexity in the design and the greater number of elements, active instruments are more expensive compared to passive instruments. Passive instruments are cheaper, therefore economical.
Resolution They have a high resolution. They have a relatively lower resolution compared to active instruments.
Example Liquid level indicator, flow indicator, among others. Pressure gauge, voltmeter, glass thermometer, ammeter, among others.

Related:
What is the Difference Between Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption?

In data transfer, a symmetric encryption is not the same as an asymmetric Read More

Difference between two-stroke and four-stroke engines?

One of the most common doubts for lay people in the world of Read More

Difference between Token and Cryptocurrency?

Today, we are living in the digital finance boom. There isn't a day Read More

Difference between Flowchart and Algorithm?

Flow charts and algorithm are tools used by software developers when creating new Read More